Monday

The full moon of September 2021 will be shining in the night sky this week, just in time for the official start of fall as the autumn equinox arrives.

Better known as the “harvest moon,” the September moon will officially reach its fullest phase at 7:54 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 20. But it will look big and bright for a few days.

The moon will be 98% full on Sunday, 100% full Monday and Tuesday, and 98% full on Wednesday, Sept. 22 — the first official day of fall, known as the autumn equinox or autumnal equinox. The equinox occurs when the sun rises directly over the equator, bringing an almost equal amount of daylight and darkness hours in the northern and southern hemispheres on that calendar day.

The best time to see the September harvest moon will be when it begins to rise in the eastern sky at about 7:15 p.m. Eastern time Monday, 20 minutes after the sun sets, and as it starts to rise at 7:36 p.m. on Tuesday.

The near-full moon will be rising Sunday at 6:48 p.m. and Wednesday at 7:59 p.m.

September’s full moon has a nickname related to the growing season. During most years, it is called the “harvest moon,” but sometimes that nickname is reserved for the October full moon.

It all depends on which of those two full moons appears closest to date of the autumn equinox.

Because this year’s full moon will appear on the night of Sept. 20, two days before autumn arrives, it will be called a harvest moon.

Last year, the September full moon appeared on Sept. 1, followed by another full moon on Oct. 1. “Because October 1 was closer to the equinox, October’s full moon was called the harvest moon and September’s full moon took on its traditional name: the corn moon,” the Old Farmer’s Almanac noted.

In addition to those nicknames, some native American tribes call the September full moon the barley moon, “because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley,” the Old Farmer’s Almanac says.

Space.com says the September full moon was known as the “falling leaves moon” among the Ojibwe tribe in the Great Lakes region, while the Cree of Ontario referred to this moon as the “rutting moon” because September was the time when many animals, particularly deer, started their mating.

Learn Native American Names: Soaproot (Pomo). Corn Moon (Pueblo). Harvest moon (Hopi). Singing Moon (Celtic). Leaf fall Moon (Kiowa). Ripe Moon (San Juan). Maize Moon (Natchez). Acorns Moon (Wishram). Rice Moon (Anishnaabe). Hay Cutting Moon (Yuchi). Mulberry Moon (Choctaw). Deer Paw Moon (Omaha). Snow Goose Moon (Cree). Freshness Moon (Mohawk). Harvest Moon (Neo-Pagan). Harvest (Colonial American). Little Chestnut Moon (Creek). Corn Maker Moon (Abernaki). Drying Grass Moon (Arapaho). Yellow Leaf Moon (Assiniboine). Drying Grass Moon (Cheyenne). Autumn Moon (Passamaquoddy). Barley Moon (Mediaeval English). Calves Hair Growth Moon (Dakota). Yellow Leaf Moon(Taos Native American). Nut Moon, Black Butterfly Moon (Cherokee). Drying Grass Moon, Black Calve Moon, fScarlet Plum Moon (Sioux). Harvest Moon, Corn Moon, Barley Moon, Fruit Moon, Dying Grass Moon (Algonquin).

VIDEO

Friday

Shelby Elizabeth Mata, a tribal citizen of the Comanche Nation, was crowned Miss Native American USA 2021-2022 on Friday, Sept. 10 in a special ceremony.

“We are saddened to go another year without competition. This year would have been our 10th Anniversary scholarship pageant but we understand Indian Country is still at risk to the Covid-19 Delta Variant. We hope that calling upon our first runner-up demonstrates our commitment to continue representing Indian Country while providing opportunities to our former past contestants,” Tashina Atine (DinĂ©), founder and CEO of the pageant said.

“We look forward to welcoming Shelby and are grateful for her and her family. We would like to thank Comanche Nation Tribal Chairman Mark Woommavovah for accepting our invitation to crown Shelby Mata on our behalf this year,” Atine continued.

Mata is from Walter, Okla. A winner of eight previous tribal and powwow royalty titles with her tribe and community, she becomes the ninth crowned Miss Native American USA. She is a southern cloth and buckskin powwow dancer who has traveled extensively across the United States and abroad to represent her tradition and culture.

“I am honored and very excited for this upcoming year to represent the Miss Native American USA 2021-22,” Mata said. “I look forward to the new friendships, experiences, and opportunity to share my platform. I want to thank my parents for always being so supportive, my friends, and to all my supporters who have encouraged me and given me kind words along the way.”

Mata is Miss Native American USA’s first contestant titleholder from Oklahoma and was crowned at the Comanche Nation Complex’s Comanche Code Talker Room by Woommavovah.

During a competition two years ago, Mata said she upholds a platform that spreads the message of cultural knowledge and awareness. The platform focuses on identity, connection to culture, balancing tribal and American societal values in addition to encouraging one another.

The next competitive Miss Native American USA pageant is scheduled for the fall of 2022 at the Tempe Center for the Arts in Tempe, Ariz.

Source
VIDEO

Thursday

Shangani Mathebula, Emmanuel Mdhluli and Walter Hendrik Mangane were arrested in 2017 for killing three rhinos in Marula, in the south section of the Kruger National Park.

Three rhino poachers were sentenced to a combined 105 years in prison on Friday.

Shangani Mathebula, Emmanuel Mdhluli from Mozambique and Walter Hendrik Mangane from South Africa were arrested in 2017 for killing three rhinos in Marula, in the south section of the Kruger National Park.

Park spokesperson Ike Phaahla welcomed the hefty sentence and said it should serve as a deterrent to criminals.

More than 249 rhinos were poached for their horns across South Africa between January and June this year with 40 alleged poachers arrested within the Kruger National Park alone.

Managing executive of the KNP Gareth Coleman said: "These sentences should serve as a deterrent to those intending to come and kill our natural heritage and destroying the livelihoods of our people. We have in the past few months intensified our security efforts in the Park to good effect but successful convictions require that the prosecutorial and justice pillars in our society are operating effectively."

The southern region of the Kruger is defined by the shapes of smooth granite koppies, rare trees like the Cape chestnut, coral and fever-berry, and the prevalence of White Rhino.

South Africa holds the majority of the world’s rhinos and has been the country hit hardest by poaching criminals, with more than 1,000 rhinos killed each year between 2013 and 2017.

Source

The most notable catch in Saturday's game between No. 22 Miami and Appalachian State didn’t even happen on the field. Wasn’t even a football. It was a cat.

The animal somehow got into Hard Rock Stadium, then got caught by one of its paws off the facade of the upper deck in the first quarter. It eventually fell to the lower level of the stadium, where fans using an American flag as a makeshift net of sorts were able to safely catch it before it was carried off to safety.

“They were trying to grab it from above and they couldn’t reach it but they were scaring it downward,” said Craig Cromer, a facilities manager at the University of Miami and season-ticket holder who with his wife Kimberly brings the flag to each home game. “It hung there for a little while with its two front paws, then one paw, then I was like, ‘Oh my goodness, it’s coming soon.’”

That’s when the Cromers unhooked the flag from the ties they use to keep it on a railing and hoped for the best. The petrified cat fell, bounced a bit off the flag and eventually was secured by some in the nearby student section before being brought away by stadium security workers.

Miami coach Manny Diaz said he learned of the cat incident postgame. The Hurricanes held on Saturday, topping Appalachian State 25-23.

“I don’t know anything about that or what was going on,” Diaz said. “But I’ll tell you, if the cat will help us in our red-zone offense I’m going to see if we can give it a scholarship.”

The cat was not showing any signs of injury. The Cromers, other than a spilled beverage and getting sprayed by the dangling cat, were otherwise fine.

“Strangest thing that’s ever happened at a game,” Kimberly Cromer said.

Source
VIDEO

Tuesday

There’s nothing stronger in this world than the love felt for parents. And that doesn’t apply only to human beings, but all beings as well. Therefore, losing a parent is the most tragic experience for any creature on Earth. And wildlife photographer Phil Moore captured some touching photos, to prove that.

After loosing its mom, because of poaching, for this gorilla the pain is all too real. And since the moment is so overwhelming, the poor creature finds support in one of the park’s rangers, Patrick Karabaranga, whose compassion for the orphaned gorilla is touching as well.

The photo was captured at Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A place where orphaned gorillas like this one are find comfort and protection from the cruel poachers.

As a result of mass deforestation, the mountain gorillas, like many other species, have become a critically endangered species. In the last years, their numbers have dramatically declined. Beside that, poaching is the other human activity that threats the wildlife.

Some great conservation efforts have been made in order to restore the gorilla population and Virunga National Park can be a very positive example in this way. Here are living around 200 individuals, about a quarter of the world’s mountain gorilla population. However, there is still much to be done!

Virunga National Park is a national park in the Albertine Rift Valley in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was created in 1925 and is among the first protected areas in Africa. In elevation, it ranges from 680 m (2,230 ft) in the Semliki River valley to 5,109 m (16,762 ft) in the Rwenzori Mountains. From north to south it extends about 300 km (190 mi), largely along the international borders with Uganda and Rwanda in the east. It covers an area of 8,090 km2 (3,120 sq mi).

Source
Two active volcanoes are located in the park, Mount Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira. They have significantly shaped the national park's diverse habitats and wildlife. More than 3,000 faunal and floral species have been recorded, of which more than 300 are endemic to the Albertine Rift including eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei) and golden monkey (Cercopithecus kandti).

In 1979, the National Park was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of its rich diversity of habitats, exceptional biodiversity and endemism, and its protection of rare mountain gorilla habitat. It has been listed in the List of World Heritage in Danger since 1994 because of civil unrest and the increase of human presence in the region.

VIDEO

Stats

Archives

Pages