Wednesday

Jenny Siberian Husky makes friends with a wild elk that was sitting in the back of property in Loveland, Colorado

With more than 23 million acres of public land, Colorado is an outdoor enthusiast's paradise Common across North America hundreds of years ago, wild populations of elk are now concentrated in the western, mountainous portions of the continent.

Elk are also called wapiti, a Native American word that means "light-colored deer." Elk are related to deer but are much larger than most of their relatives. A bull (male) elk's antlers may reach 4 feet (1.2 meters) above its head, so that the animal towers 9 feet (2.7 meters) tall.

Bull elk lose their antlers each March, but they begin to grow them back in May in preparation for the late-summer breeding season.



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Tuesday

Bibi the baby Nigerian dwarf goat challenges his gentle horse friend to a playful headbutt duel.

A plucky goat has been caught on camera trying to impress his horse friend with some adorable nose rubs.

Virginie Bourdes, who lives on a farm in the South of France, captured her pet dwarf goat Bibi performing a courtship-like dance on his hind legs to a horse in the stable.

As he nears the large equine, he gives its nose an affectionate rub with his own. When he loses his balance, he shuffles backwards and performs the move again towards the stable door.

Bourdes can be heard giggling in the background as she watches the comical moment unfold. At one point the horse issues a few licks to its new hoofed friend.


The patchy brown and white goat appears to be the same height as the horse's knees. Many viewers have deemed the animal's bond 'cute' and 'adorable'.

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Here's a real beauty to get us off on the right foot. Though Husky puppies can and do live all over the world, the merest mention of the Husky conjures images of harsh, cold terrain and fresh powder as far as the eye can see.

 There's nothing quite like a party of Husky puppies, because a Husky puppy party will run around all day until you're completely exhausted.

Then they'll try to howl, making a bunch of mewling little squeaks instead, since they haven't yet properly mastered howling. You'll be hunched over with laughter and get cramps.

Now you're out of breath as well as energy, and in the best kind of pain.

these beautiful eyes gazed upon the world and everyone melted a little inside.




VIDEO- What's cuter than a litter of husky puppies running and rolling around?














Luther Standing Bear was an Oglala Lakota Sioux Chief who, among a few rare others such as Charles Eastman, Black Elk and Gertrude Bonnin occupied the rift between the way of life of the Indigenous people of the Great Plains before, and during, the arrival and subsequent spread of the European pioneers.

 Raised in the traditions of his people until the age of eleven, he was then educated at the Carlisle Indian Industrial Boarding School of Pennsylvania, where he learned the english language and way of life. (Though a National Historical Landmark, Carlisle remains a place of controversy in Native circles.)

Like his above mentioned contemporaries, however, his native roots were deep, leaving him in the unique position of being a conduit between cultures. Though his movement through the white man’s world was not without “success” — he had numerous movie roles in Hollywood — his enduring legacy was the protection of the way of life of his people.

By the time of his death he had published 4 books and had become a leader at the forefront of the progressive movement aimed at preserving Native American heritage and sovereignty, coming to be known as a strong voice in the education of the white man as to the Native American way of life. Here, then, are 10 quotes from the great Sioux Indian Chief known as Standing Bear that will be sure to disturb much of what you think you know about “modern” culture.


1) Praise, flattery, exaggerated manners and fine, high-sounding words were no part of Lakota politeness. Excessive manners were put down as insincere, and the constant talker was considered rude and thoughtless. Conversation was never begun at once, or in a hurried manner.

2) Children were taught that true politeness was to be defined in actions rather than in words. They were never allowed to pass between the fire and the older person or a visitor, to speak while others were speaking, or to make fun of a crippled or disfigured person. If a child thoughtlessly tried to do so, a parent, in a quiet voice, immediately set him right.


3) Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and regardful of the rule that ‘thought comes before speech.’…and in the midst of sorrow, sickness, death or misfortune of any kind, and in the presence of the notable and great, silence was the mark of respect… strict observance of this tenet of good behavior was the reason, no doubt, for his being given the false characterization by the white man of being a stoic. He has been judged to be dumb, stupid, indifferent, and unfeeling.

4) We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, the winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild’. Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was it ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery.


5) With all creatures of the earth, sky and water was a real and active principle. In the animal and bird world there existed a brotherly feeling that kept the Lakota safe among them. And so close did some of the Lakotas come to their feathered and furred friends that in true brotherhood they spoke a common tongue.


6) This concept of life and its relations was humanizing and gave to the Lakota an abiding love. It filled his being with the joy and mystery of living; it gave him reverence for all life; it made a place for all things in the scheme of existence with equal importance to all. 7) It was good for the skin to touch the earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth… the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.

8) Everything was possessed of personality, only differing from us in form. Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library and its books were the stones, leaves, grass, brooks, and the birds and animals that shared, alike with us, the storms and blessings of earth. We learned to do what only the student of nature learns, and that was to feel beauty. We never railed at the storms, the furious winds, and the biting frosts and snows. To do so intensified human futility, so whatever came we adjusted ourselves, by more effort and energy if necessary, but without complaint.

9) …the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.

10) Civilization has been thrust upon me… and it has not added one whit to my love for truth, honesty, and generosity.
 Source

Monday

Two adorable newborn polar bear cubs play with their mother while they journey to the frozen sea.

 One cute cub climbs and hangs off mother's back. Features cubs play-fighting and nursing with mom. Very cute video!

Polar bear cubs are born November through January in a den. Mother and cubs emerge from their den in late March or April.

Most adult females give birth once every three years. In populations with access to abundant food, birth occurs once every two years.


The most frequent litter size is two, followed by litters of one. Litters of three are less common than twins or singles, and litters of four are rare.

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