Monday

With unseasonably warm summer temperatures persisting over much of the world this year, it seems hard to believe that this is the week of the Harvest Moon, the full moon nearest to the autumnal equinox.

Saturday, Sept. 22, was the first official day of autumn in much of the Northern Hemisphere, even though it will still officially be summer through the daylight hours. The moment of the equinox — the official end of summer and beginning of autumn — will not arrive until 9:54 p.m. EDT. East of the prime meridian, where the equinox occurs after midnight, the first day of fall will actually be on Sunday (0154 GMT, Sept. 23).

The moon will officially turn full two nights later, on Monday (Sept. 24), when it will reach the spot in the sky opposite (180 degrees) to the sun. That moment will occur at 10:52 p.m. EDT (0252 GMT on Sept. 25). The moon will slowly wane thereafter, making this upcoming week one that will be rich in moonlight. [The Moon: 10 Surprising Lunar Facts]

This year's version of the Harvest Moon falls in September, although on occasion, this branding can be conferred upon the October full moon. From 1970 to 2020, this calendrical oddity happens a dozen times and in fact happened just last year. The Harvest Moon can occur as early as Sept. 8 (as in 2014) or as late as Oct. 7 (as in 1987).

Origin of the Harvest Moon

So, by all of the natural signs in the heavens, the time of autumn harvest is with us again. The term Harvest Moon traces back to preindustrial times, when farmers — lacking the technology available today — were pressed by the season and welcomed a moonlit week to stretch the shortening daylight hours. Their fields had to be harvested before the farm could be bundled up for the impending winter season. Crops had to be housed. Firewood had to be cut. The daylight hours were rapidly diminishing at this time of year; seemingly, there was not enough time for all the chores that needed to be done in the sun. The Harvest Moon was a welcome lantern in the early evening sky.


This year, it's merely a beautiful late September moon that will provide a series of bright moonlit nights at a time when the seasons are at the turn. The next full moon, on Oct. 24, will be the Hunter's Moon, traditionally touched with frost and framed in the glorious colors of autumn leaves.

The seasons march on. Summer wanes and comes to its end with this weekend's waxing moon.


Native American Names: Soaproot (Pomo). Corn Moon (Pueblo). Harvest moon (Hopi). Singing Moon (Celtic). Leaf fall Moon (Kiowa). Ripe Moon (San Juan). Maize Moon (Natchez). Acorns Moon (Wishram). Rice Moon (Anishnaabe). Hay Cutting Moon (Yuchi). Mulberry Moon (Choctaw). Deer Paw Moon (Omaha). Snow Goose Moon (Cree). Freshness Moon (Mohawk). Harvest Moon (Neo-Pagan). Harvest (Colonial American). Little Chestnut Moon (Creek). Corn Maker Moon (Abernaki). Drying Grass Moon (Arapaho). Yellow Leaf Moon (Assiniboine). Drying Grass Moon (Cheyenne). Autumn Moon (Passamaquoddy). Barley Moon (Mediaeval English). Calves Hair Growth Moon (Dakota). Yellow Leaf Moon(Taos Native American). Nut Moon, Black Butterfly Moon (Cherokee). Drying Grass Moon, Black Calve Moon, fScarlet Plum Moon (Sioux). Harvest Moon, Corn Moon, Barley Moon, Fruit Moon, Dying Grass Moon (Algonquin).

VIDEO

Sean Penn, the winner of two Oscars, stopped by the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, on Sunday to assist in the relief efforts in a region that has been hit hard from flooding, power outages in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence that hit both Carolinas hard over a week ago.

The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina has collaborated with Chef Jose Andres’ organization World Central Kitchen, and Sean Penn’s organization J/P HRO to see to the needs of this community in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. Chef Jose Andres and his staff along with J/P HRO have continued to deliver meals to our site for distribution and have assisted with our disaster relief efforts.

On Sunday, Sean Penn and Chef Jose Andres met with Chairman Harvey Godwin, Jr. and Tribal Staff to discuss the ongoing relief efforts and the needs of our community going forward.

Penn was able to be observe and visit with tribal staff and volunteers, as they worked to get supplies and meals distributed to our community members. During his visit Sean Penn and J/P HRO wanted to ensure the focus was and remained on the relief efforts. Mr. Penn was extremely humble and sincere in his desire to help our community and the Lumbee Tribe is grateful for his concern and generosity.

Chef Jose Andres’ organization, World Central Kitchen uses the expertise of its Chef Network to empower people to be part of the solution, with a focus on health, education, jobs and social enterprise.

Sean Penn’s organization, J/P HRO has four core programs: Community Health, Community Development, Engineering and Construction, and Reforestation. J/P HRO’s mission is to save lives and build sustainable programs quickly and effectively with those impacted by disasters.


The Lumee Tribe says due to the partnerships with these two organizations, the Tribe has been able to provide food and needed supplies throughout our tribal community in the storm’s aftermath and expresses its gratitude.
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Sunday

This month's full moon holds an extra special historical meaning, and while that meaning might no longer be relevant to our modern lives, it's still worth reflecting on and celebrating.

If you've ever wondered why the September 2018 full moon is called the Harvest Moon, it's essentially what it sounds like; the moon that comes in time for harvesting.

According to the Old Farmer's Almanac, the Harvest Moon related to the annual gathering of crops. During this time, the crops that spent the summer growing and becoming ripe would officially be ready to pick. The Harvest Moon marked an annual excursion in which farmers would bring in the food and resources they needed to make it through the colder and darker months. Timing was crucial because if they weren't quick, the animals could beat them to the crops, and if the crops weren't picked at their peak ripeness, they might become rotten and inedible or unusable. So, due to its utility, the Harvest Moon was always strictly tied to the autumn equinox.

The autumn equinox occurs each year when the sun crosses the equator in the end of September. This event usually occurs on or around September 21, though this year it will occur on September 22. While the Harvest Moon typically falls in the month of September, every three years or so, it will come in October. The Harvest Moon was essentially regarded as a visual alarm clock that let farmers know it was time to rush to their crops. Culturally, the Harvest Moon was also a time that people spent nesting and preparing theirselves and their homes for the new season.

Throughout history, the Harvest Moon's presence in the sky would signify the change of seasons. While we don't need the moon as a reminder to collect our crops, this moon has worked its way into the cultural fibers of our modern existence. We're not farming by its light, but we can still appreciate how the moon's presence in the sky has changed in significance over the course of our time here.

It is also called the Barley Moon because this is the time to harvest and thresh ripened barley.

Photo Credit: MacNeal Crank monument valley ‏ 

Some other traditional September Full Moon names used by Native Americans include:

“Moon When the Plums Are Scarlet” by the Lakota Sioux Native Americans.
“Moon When the Deer Paw the Earth” by the Omaha Native Americans.
“Moon When the Calves Grow Hair” by the Sioux Native Americans



Learn Native American Names: Soaproot (Pomo). Corn Moon (Pueblo). Harvest moon (Hopi). Singing Moon (Celtic). Leaf fall Moon (Kiowa). Ripe Moon (San Juan). Maize Moon (Natchez). Acorns Moon (Wishram). Rice Moon (Anishnaabe). Hay Cutting Moon (Yuchi). Mulberry Moon (Choctaw). Deer Paw Moon (Omaha). Snow Goose Moon (Cree). Freshness Moon (Mohawk). Harvest Moon (Neo-Pagan). Harvest (Colonial American). Little Chestnut Moon (Creek). Corn Maker Moon (Abernaki). Drying Grass Moon (Arapaho). Yellow Leaf Moon (Assiniboine). Drying Grass Moon (Cheyenne). Autumn Moon (Passamaquoddy). Barley Moon (Mediaeval English). Calves Hair Growth Moon (Dakota). Yellow Leaf Moon(Taos Native American). Nut Moon, Black Butterfly Moon (Cherokee). Drying Grass Moon, Black Calve Moon, fScarlet Plum Moon (Sioux). Harvest Moon, Corn Moon, Barley Moon, Fruit Moon, Dying Grass Moon (Algonquin).

Other moon names : Wine moon, Blood Moon, Sturgeon Moon

VIDEO

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has declined a request for federal assistance from the Oglala Sioux Tribe from severe weather in July.

In a letter sent to Oglala Sioux Tribe President Troy ‘Scott’ Weston, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Brock Long said storms and tornadoes in late July on the Pine Ridge Reservation did not meet the criteria to receive federal aid. The storms happened in the region on July 27-29.

“Based on our review of all the information available, it has been determined that the damage from this event was not of such severity and magnitude as toward supplemental federal disaster assistance under the Stafford Act,” Long said in the letter.

The storm in July formed in Montana before racing southward into South Dakota, producing 80 mph wind gusts and dropping large hail in and around Oglala Lakota County later into the evening. The letter then continued to say the denial can be appealed within 30 days of Sept. 18.

Oglala residents are no strangers to storms, but severe hail damage ruined homes and left homeowners picking up the pieces.

The storm formed in Montana during the afternoon before racing southward into South Dakota, producing 80 mph wind gusts and dropping large hail in and around Oglala Lakota County later into the evening.


Mike Weasel Bear talked about his son trying to protect his family.

"[My son] was trying to protect the grandkids, and his wife, you know, from being hit by the hail.” Weasel Bear said. “They were trying to make it into the house. As he was protecting them, he got hit pretty good. We took him to the hospital last night. He was up there about 3-4 hours."
Source






A touching photo of three Belgian Malinois dogs sharing kisses before saying their final goodbyes has dog lovers’ hearts breaking.

Reddit user Rawtashk posted the photo of their oldest dog – 11-year-old Sef – saying goodbye to his family before being put to sleep later that day.

He wrote, “Our old boy is getting put down today. Somehow our other 2 seem to know, and they’ve been saying goodbye all morning.”

The family arranged for the veterinarian to come to their home so the family could be with Sef when he crossed Rainbow Bridge. “You know you have a good boy when your vet doesn’t normally do at-home euthanasia, but she volunteers to come out and do it for Sef,” said Rawtashk in his post.

“And that’s what happened this morning. Somehow Rhonin and Jaina both knew, because they kept coming over and giving Sef kisses this morning while we waited for the vet.”

“Sef was able to go peacefully at home, while my wife and I stroked his fur and told him how much we loved him and how much we were going to miss him,” he revealed.


“I love you, Sef. You were the best boy I could have ever asked for. I would have carried you forever, had I been able to, but it wasn’t fair for you.”

Following up on his original post, the family wrote: “Thanks for the kind words everyone. We said our goodbyes and he’s getting cremated so we can put his ashes on the mantle next to our first dog. He was the best boy I could have ever asked for. Love you buddy. I hope you had a wonderful time.”

Sef’s owner later told LADbible that since Sef was put to sleep his other two dogs have been a bit sad.


“We have two dogs still,” he said. “A five-year old male named Rhonin and a two-year old female named Jaina. Rhonin has a very soft personality, and I can tell he still thinks something is wrong, although that might just be because he’s picking up on my general demeanor.”

“Jaina is more outgoing and energetic, so she doesn’t seem too phased by it….but last night she did come over to the couch and sniff around at the blanket on the couch that has been Sef’s ‘spot’ for the last five months or so.”

Jaina also knows she’s not allowed on the couch but she jumped up on it and “curled up where Sef would normally be” the dog owner revealed.
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