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The Cherokee refer to themselves as Ani-Yunwiya, which means "Principal People". The Cherokee were one of the first, if not the first, major non-European ethnic group to become U.S. citizens

 Cherokee men traditionally wore a feather or two tied at the crown of the head. In the early 18th century, Cherokee men wore cotton trade shirts, loincloths, leggings, front-seam moccasins, finger-woven or beaded belts, multiple pierced earrings around the rim of the ear, and a blanket over one shoulder.

At that time, Cherokee women wore mantles of leather or feathers, skirts of leather or woven mulberry bark, front-seam moccasins, and earrings pierced through the earlobe only. By the end of the 18th century, Cherokee men were dressing much like their white neighbors.

Men were wearing shirts, pants, and trade coats, with a distinctly Cherokee turban. Women were wearing calico skirts, blouses, and shawls.

Today Cherokee people dress like other Americans, except for special occasions, when the men wear ribbon shirts with jeans and moccasins, and the women wear tear dresses with corn beads, woven belts, and moccasins.
Cherokee people

 Marcia Pascal (the daughter of Col. George Washington Pascal and Sarah Ridge-Pascal) - Cherokee/EuroAmerican - 1880

 Cherokee mother and child

Ah-yoh-gah (aka Little Foot) - Cherokee - 1875

Cherokee woman - 1888

Daughter of Ayasta - Cherokee - 1888

Tsianina Redfeather - Creek/Cherokee - circa 1925 Famous Singer

Cherokee - circa 1930

 Cherokee group - no date

 Cherokee group preparing for a Stickball Game at Qualla Reservation in North Carolina - 1888

 Inez L. Mitchel - Cherokee - 1909

 Sunshine Rider (aka Atalie Unkalunt) - Cherokee - circa 1920

 Cherokee - 1949

Cherokee Girls Tennessee State Library and Archives

Cherokee Girl Tennessee State Library and Archives

Responses to "Rare, Old Photos of Aniyunwiya (Also known as the Cherokee people)"

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